How To

Denny Brauer on Bass Tournaments: Know You Can Win

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5 Denny Brauer

Would you like to learn how to win a bass tournament and win millions of dollars? In the new eBook How to Win a Bass Tournament by John E. Phillips, he interviews eight professional bass fishermen who have won over $20 million in bass fishing tournaments and made over $50 million in residuals related to bass fishing.

In February 2013, the bass fishing world will be tuned-in for the Bassmaster Classic to see who the best bass fisherman for 2013 really is. Deep in the heart of every bass fisherman, especially tournament fisherman, is the dream of one day winning the Bassmaster Classic. In How to Win a Bass Tournament, you’ll learn how Kevin VanDam, George Cochran, Mark Davis, Shaw Grigsby, Rick Clunn, Mark Rose, Denny Brauer and Larry Nixon have won hundreds of bass tournaments.

One of the most versatile and most successful fishermen on the BASS circuit is Denny Brauer of Camdenton, Missouri, who has earned more than $3 million in tournament winnings from fishing Bassmaster and other tournament circuits, not including his endorsements and sponsors.

Although he’s tagged as a flipper and a pitcher, Brauer primarily fishes the jigging spoon, one of his favorite tactics, and also is deadly with the drop-shot. Brauer isalso  noted for his quick wit and his love of aggravating the press. When asked about the five ways he hates to fish, he smiled and said, “There’s no way I don’t like to fish. I love to fish every tactic and every lure, and I love every body of water where I tournament fish.”

When you see the twinkle in Brauer’s eye and a smile as big as a Cheshire cat on his face after this type of statement, you instantly know he’s hooked you again. He finishes with the words, “I have no negative thoughts at all about fishing.” Then finally, with a big smile he says, “Okay, I’ll throw you some bread crumbs.” We can use Brauer’s wisdom to become better bass fishermen.

“The most important ingredient for winning a tournament is having confidence in yourself and your fishing ability to know you can win a tournament,” Denny Brauer emphasizes. “This one factor separates great fishermen from also-rans. At any tournament, you’ll have three different types of fishermen–some who think they can win, others who hope they eventually will win, and the few competitors who know they can win, and they’re the bass fishermen who win multiple tournaments. I don’t really know where all that confidence comes from, but success often breeds success. When you win a tournament, you seem to climb another rung in the ladder of bass fishing confidence.

“Actually that confidence in fishing a tournament is common sense. If you want to make money from endorsements, sponsors, speaking engagements and public appearances, you have to win and have that mentality to win. Early in my bass fishing career, I was just attempting to survive. When I first got into bass fishing, making sure I got a paycheck was far more important to me than winning or losing. But if you look at the big picture, you don’t have many opportunities to win in bass fishing.

“In NASCAR, a driver has 45 races a year where he can win. But on the Bassmaster circuit, we only have eight tournaments, and there are from 150 to 200 competitors in the race trying to win. So, I always figure, why squander one of those opportunities fishing conservatively? I swing for the fence every time I enter a BASS tournament, and I strike out a lot. But I also win. If I were to give someone advice on how to win a bass tournament, it would be to learn to find that confidence for yourself. Then when you go to a tournament, you won’t just hope to win or think you may win, you’ll know beyond a shadow of a doubt that you’re willing to do whatever is required to win.”

To learn more about bass fishing and to get How to Win a Bass Tournamentclick here. Or, go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks, type in the name of the book, and download it to your Kindle and/or download a Kindle app for your iPad, SmartPhone or computer.

Image by John Phillips

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