How To

Tuesday’s Take Your Best Shot: Archery Pronghorn    

Mark Kayser Sept 6 pronghorn no aiming points

Scenario: Pronghorn buck drinking; bowhunter in ground blind across the waterhole

Bow: Mathews Heli-M

Range: 32 yards

Conditions: Sunny; 87 degrees; 10-mph wind, left to right

Ranchers may refer to them as “goats,” but this big pronghorn buck represents a near-Booner opportunity. You’re “Sweating to the Oldies” like a young Richard Simmons as this buck nears your Cabela’s pop-up blind. As the buck drops his head for a drink, you know you have 1-2 minutes to make the shot, but this buck’s quartering-toward position brings on an additional rush of forehead flooding.

Do you hold off and wait for a broadside shot? Or can you get the job done if your arrow strikes aiming point A, B or C?

Mark Kayser Sept 6 Pronghorn small aiming points

A. Quartering-to shots do little for diminishing the flow of sweat. Aim for where the shoulders meet and drive your G5 broadhead right into this buck’s electrical circuitry. You’ll break the circuits and smash the fuse box to drop him in his tracks.

B. Aim precisely and line up your HHA single-pin inside the shoulder and between the neck. Yes, you may encounter some bone obstruction, but pronghorns are light boned and your Mathews has plenty of extra energy. Drive that arrow right into the buck’s support system.

C. Are you still worried about possible bone blockage in option B? You could slide your pin to the right and let go right behind that near shoulder. Of course, you could be in for a long trailing job as well; you’ll miss most vital organs and have to hope for severed arteries to get the job done.

Considering all the options, I say wipe the sweat from your brow and forget about Richard Simmons’ hair. Go with option B. You can do it, and this pronghorn will roll after a short run.

Don’t believe me? Watch the video below and see for yourself.

Image by Mark Kayser

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