How To

Catching Bass in Late Summer with Mark Rose: The Bass Aren’t All Deep in August and September

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Editor’s note: Mark Rose of Marion, Arkansas, who has won more than $1.5 million, is a professional bass fisherman, a member of War Eagle Boats’ and Strike King’s Pro Staffs and the winner of six FLW tournaments.

One of the biggest mistakes that many bass fishermen make when the weather’s hot is thinking that all the bass are holding in deep water along underwater river channels, creek drop-offs and ledges. However, regardless of the time of the year, you can always locate shallow water bass. Even when the air temperature is 100 degrees or more, deep water isn’t the only place where bass can find cool water. They also can enjoy cooler water in the shade, grass and current. One of the advantages you have if you buy or own a War Eagle boat is that at this time of the year, your War Eagle boat will allow you to get to places where bass are holding that bigger, heavier boats can’t reach.

I’ve been fishing out of a War Eagle Boat for 15 years, and one of my favorite ways to pinpoint and catch bass during August and September is to get off the main river or the main lake and try to get into the skinny (relatively shallow water) backwater areas. You may have to jump a beaver dam or run your boat wide open to slide across a mud flat to get into some of these types of sites. You may have to go up a small stream or a ditch that opens up into a backwater region, that has grass or shade trees lining the banks. Some of these skinny water areas will have small creeks or rivers feeding into them.

At this time of year, bass fishing can be extraordinary in these kinds of places, and often a tough War Eagle boat is the only way to reach these areas. When I am fishing here, I like to use the Strike King 1.0 Crankbait, a new little bait that Strike King recently has released. I like to use the sexy shad color or chartreuse with a black back. This lure is deadly effective on shoal bass, redeye bass and spotted bass, as well as largemouth. I also like to fish the Strike King Bitsy Bug, a small little jig, and the small Strike King Tour Grade Finesse Football Head Jig – especially if I can find rock bottom where small creeks and rivers feed these backwater areas. On the Finesse Football Head Jig, I like to use a Strike King Rage Baby Craw as a trailer. I like to use small, 3/16-ounce baits in green pumpkin on 15-pound-test fluorocarbon line when I’m fishing skinny water. Although I prefer fishing these lures on a baitcasting rod, I always carry my spinning rod. Then I can skip some of these lures off the surface of the water and get them as far back into the shade as I can.

To learn more about how to fish for bass with Mark Rose, click the titles for these two new bass books by John E. Phillips, “How to Bass Fish Like a Pro” and “Catch the Most and Biggest Bass in Any Lake,” or go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks, and type in the names of the books to buy them. Too, you can download a Kindle app for free and buy the books from Amazon to read on your iPad, SmartPhone or computer.

To learn more about top-quality War Eagle boats, click here.

Click here to read about fishing the Shaky Head Worm for reeling in bass in late summer and early fall.

Images courtesy John Phillips

Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of OutdoorHub. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their writers.
  • http://www.facebook.com/GalleryWrapp Todd Jones

    Great to see Mark is doing well! We worked together many years ago when he was a department manager at Sports Unlimited. Livin’ the Dream. Keep it up.