How To

How To Process Deer At Home

After you have dressed your deer, you may decide to sharpen your knives and complete the job rather than go the professional route for processing. You will find these cutting instructions helpful.

  1. Rear shank
  2. Heel
  3. Round steak
  4. Rump and hip lion
  5. Loin chop or roast
  6. Rib chop or roast
  7. Top of shoulder or chuck
  8. Arm roast
  9. Front shank
  10. Breast
  11. Flank

 

 

 

Quartering and Cutting

While the deer is still hanging, remove the neck by following line F in the drawing. Saw the carcass down the center of the backbone, dividing it into two halves. Place the sides of venison inside down on a table and quarter by cutting between the last two ribs, line D, to ensure easy handling. If additional cutting is to be done, remove the legs by cutting close to and in front of the hipbone, line C, and between the 4th and 5th ribs, line E.

Cuts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 11

First, place leg outside down on the table and remove flank (No. 11). Cut rump (No. 4) from the round by following along line B, just below the pelvic bone. Slice No. 3 into five or six -inch round steaks. No. 2, the lower round or heel severed at line A, is suitable for a pot roast. Bone out shank (No. 1), grind meat, and use for deer sausage and deer burgers.

Loin and Ribs

Remove breast (No. 10) by cutting several inches from tenderloin muscle on the loin end (No. 5) and about 3 inches from the backbone on the rib end (No. 6) along line H. The loin and ribs, No. 5 and No. 6, can be cut into  6inch chops or used as a roast.

Shoulder-Cuts 7, 8, and 9

The shoulder joint is prominent and cuts 7 and 8 can be separated along line H. If the joint cannot be found, use a saw to cut along line H. Saw off the shank (No. 9) and bone out along with cuts No. 10 and No. 8 and use for ground meat. Cut No. 7 makes a good pot roast.

There you go. With this guide in your in hands you can save yourself the money and process your kill yourself.

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