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Colorado River Heads List of America’s Most Endangered Rivers

dried up

A release from American Rivers found the Colorado River as the most endangered waterway in the nation. A major lifeline running through 7 states and affecting over 36 million people, the Colorado River is one of the most vital rivers in the United States. Yet due to outdated water management and overuse, the river is increasingly at risk.

Along with 9 other heavily endangered rivers such as the Niobrara and Black Warrior River, the Colorado River now stands upon the threshold of disaster. Federal agencies report that the Colorado, like others, can no longer meet the demands on it and will be reduced by 10 to 30 percent in water flow by 2050. Throughout its course, the Colorado has begun to dry up to a trickle, damaging both local economies and wildlife. The river’s multi-billion recreational and commercial industry, including angling and water sports, will be among the first to feel the impact.

To help preserve the Colorado and rivers like it, American Rivers proposes a multi-step plan that will prioritize funding to programs run by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. These programs include projects that will oversee water infrastructure, storage operations and conservation. It is hoped that new management decisions and an increase in funds will change what American Rivers call, “a century of water management policies and practices that have promoted wasteful water use.”

The other endangered rivers in the release are:

  • Flint River
  • San Saba River
  • Little Plower River
  • Catawba River
  • Boundary Waters
  • Black Warrior River
  • Rough and Ready, Baldface Creeks
  • Kootenai River
  • Niobrara River

Watch the video below for more background on the Colorado River:

Image screenshot of video by AmericanRivers on YouTube

Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of OutdoorHub. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their writers.
  • fishunter

    People, let us again join hands, hearts and minds to save the Mighty Colorado! Why has it taken so long to inform us? Where is the government Bureau of Reclamation, the Bureau of Land Management and any other department who could-have and should-have done something? Probably pointing fingers at others. Maybe Las Vegas. Los Angeles, Colorado cities and every down-stream community should re-think lawns, parks and golf courses.