Shooting Sports News

Crimson Trace Introduces Rail Master Pro Laser/Light Combo at SHOT Show

A Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro CMR-204 mounted on a Glock 20.

A Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro CMR-204 mounted on a Glock 20.

Crimson Trace, the biggest name in laser accessories for firearms, formally revealed their new Rail Master Pro laser/light combo at SHOT Show this year. Two models of the Rail Master Pro are being offered in 2014: the CMR-204 with a green laser, and the CMR-205 with a red laser. Both Pros also sport a 100-lumen LED white light and offer the same reliability and features of other Crimson Trace products.

The Pros’ lasers and lights are protected by a rugged CNC-machine aluminum housing that mounts to any standard Picatinny or Weaver rail. Both Pro models are waterproof to one meter, adjustable for windage and elevation, and have a two-hour battery life. The unit also features an automatic shut-off that engages after five minutes of inactivity. At the rear of the Pro is Crimson Trace’s familiar Instant Activation switch, which easily allows a user to quickly tap the laser and light on and off.

The Rail Master Pro can be configured to use one of four modes: laser only, light only, laser and light, and laser and light strobe. The CMR-204 will retail for $379 and the CMR-205 for $279.

Image by Matt Korovesis

Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of OutdoorHub. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their writers.
  • Merkinfan

    As a consumer am I supposed to know what a Picatinny or Weaver rail is?.

    • Matt Korovesis

      Not to sound catty, but Picatinny and Weaver rails are pretty common on most firearms these days and have been for several years. They are standardized rails (often included on a rifle’s upper receiver, its handguard, and so on) to which one can attach compatible accessories–things such as lights, scopes, grips, and so on. This article was geared toward the general gun-owning consumer, who I expect to have a passing familiarity with rails at the very least.