Hunting News

Partnership Between CONSOL Energy, Inc. and Ohio’s Division of Wildlife Leads to an Additional 1,500 Acres for Outdoor Recreation

Ohio

The property will open in time for deer archery season

A recent agreement between CONSOL Energy, Inc. and the ODNR Division of Wildlife is great news for outdoor enthusiasts. The agreement property straddling the Harrison and Belmont county lines opens 1,500 acres of land for public use. The addition sits adjacent to the 3,500-acre Jockey Hollow Wildlife Area.

This news follows another agreement where CONSOL Energy opened the 4,200-acre Powhatan Point Wildlife Area in Monroe County for public use.

“CONSOL Energy is extremely pleased to enroll an additional 1,500 acres into the Ohio Department of Natural Resources CO-OP Program,” said Tim Schivley, Manager of Rental Properties, CONSOL Land.  “This will provide areas for public recreation while keeping with CONSOL Energy’s corporate policy to manage its properties to enhance public use and increase wildlife habitat.”

“CONSOL Energy really stepped up to the plate once again for outdoor enthusiasts,” said Scott Peters, wildlife management supervisor for Division of Wildlife in Akron. “We are delighted to announce that the property will open to the public on September 29th of this year, just in time for the opening of Ohio’s deer archery season,” noted Peters.

As part of the agreement, Division of Wildlife will assume partial responsibility for the property, including enforcement of hunting regulations, other wildlife protection, illegal dumping, and off-road vehicle use.

Division of Wildlife personnel has erected signage indicating new property boundaries.

A free, revised map of the Jockey Hollow Wildlife Area is available online at www.wildohio.com or by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE. The map offers such information as public access points, habitat descriptions, and parking areas.

Logo courtesy Ohio Department of Natural Resources

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