News

Video: Steven Rinella of “Meat Eater” Defends Hunting during Book Event

Hunter, author and TV star Steven Rinella is often seen as a frontman for hunters and meat eaters. His fame comes with the responsibility to defend his hunting morals and rights as a carnivore.

On his website, Rinella points out, “As a hunter, the question comes up all the time: how can I justify the killing of animals for food? My reply varies according to the circumstances, particularly to whether or not the person is actually willing to hear my response. Recently, I was posed this question while promoting my new book, Meat Eater: Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter, at a Greenlight Bookstore event in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Here’s what happened.”

Image screenshot of video by MeatEaterTV on youtube

Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of OutdoorHub. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their writers.
  • Scott Grandy

    Anyone that claims to be 100% Vegan in any of its varying
    forms (dietary vegan, ethical vegan, life style vegan) is simply establishing
    boundaries based upon what is convenient to them.

    Metaphorically speaking, Vegans raise the bar to a level
    where they can easily get over it while criticizing others and turning a blind
    eye to the realities of our culture, existence and history. We as humans are natural killers and it starts
    with the involuntary death of microbes and germs within our bodies the moment
    we are born and extends to the outside world from that point. Anyone that pretends that they are not
    responsible for the death of the insects, mice, snakes, owls, foxes and other
    naturally occurring animals that would normally occupy the land where their vegetables
    are grown is lying to themselves. Whether
    you directly kill or indirectly kill, you can’t turn a blind eye to the effects
    of your existence.

    While living on this planet, you kill a wide variety of life
    forms in your everyday existence and that is a fact that cannot be denied. Whether it’s the insects on the grill of your
    car or the toads that are swept into your lawn mower, we all kill a wide
    variety of life forms including insects, amphibians, birds, mammals, fish, etcetera,
    each and every day. We all enjoy the convenience
    of our modern society but many Vegans choose to pretend that they are not
    responsible for the indirect deaths associated with their existence.

    That’s pure hypocrisy in my opinion and nothing short of a
    lie.

    • http://www.ofieldstream.com/ Les Booth

      A very good response Scott. I also thought Steven’s response was very realistic and far more factually based than many I’ve heard in the past.

      Mankind has been a hunter and eater of meat, far longer than he has had an ‘experimental notion’ of living without hunting, killing and eating of meat.

      As Stephen said,
      “.. to not hunt is somewhat historically off-the-mark. … the new, to-not-hunt is a fairly new experiment in the human set.” The notion of ‘not hunting’ or ‘killing’ of animals is not a natural progress of human activity; whether one is an evolutionist or not.

      Further, Stephen’s analogy of ‘asking a wolf to not hunt’, is appropriate and well framed. The wolf is a keystone predator in it’s range. Humans are so in ours; which supersedes that of the wolf. So, for man to not hunt is an unnatural state.

      If various peoples choose NOT to hunt, that is their own choice to make and I defend their right to make that choice. However, since I do not condemn them for their choice to not hunt/kill, I expect the same respect toward my choice to hunt/kill. In the same vein, each time I take to the field as a hunter, I have two choices: (1) to enjoy the ‘hunt’ and not make a kill, or (2) to enjoy the ‘hunt’ and make a kill.

      The power and extant of our intellectual choice – IS – the rung-higher humans have over all other animals. Just because we can make this choice.. does NOT remove us from the role we have in the ecosystem. We are STILL carnivores/hunters/killers. In this, I completely agree with your position, ‘ to deny the responsibility of indirect death ‘… is not only irresponsible, it is hypocrisy and a lie.