Hunting News

Wisconsin’s New Non-typical Archery Buck Record

Jim Baker's buck has supplanted Wisconsin's previous non-typical archery record.

Jim Baker's buck has supplanted Wisconsin's previous non-typical archery record.

Wisconsin bowhunter Jim Baker took an absolutely massive buck back in September, and a recent panel scoring just confirmed it as the state’s new archery record. According to the Wisconsin Buck and Bear Club, the rack was measured at a Cabela’s store in Richfield by a panel of six measurers following the mandatory 60-day drying period. After the final measurements were taken, Baker’s non-typical buck came in at 260-5/8 gross and 249-5/8 net scoreable inches.

With those kind of numbers, Baker’s buck confidently overtook the previous state non-typical archery record. In 2009, hunter Wayne Shumacher harvested a buck that measured up to 243-6/8. The Wisconsin Buck and Bear Club officially recognized the “Jim Baker Buck” as the new state record on Sunday. Baker shot the buck in Waukesha County on September 18.

“The ‘Jim Baker Buck’ taken in Waukesha County Wisconsin is another example of why Wisconsin continues to be the number one spot in North America for trophy whitetails. Wisconsin currently ranks number one in Boone & Crockett and Pope & Young record entries,” the club stated on its website.

Wisconsin did not always hold that title. In fact, the Wisconsin Buck and Bear Club traces its origins back to avid sportsman Peter Haupt, who founded the club in 1965 because he felt Wisconsin was underrepresented in the record books. At the time of the club’s founding, Wisconsin only held five entrees in Boone & Crockett Club records. Currently there are more than 300 Wisconsin deer entries recorded by Boone & Crockett, an additional 1,500 entries in the records of the Pope & Young Club and over 5,000 listings on-file with state records. In 1996, the state officially recognized the Wisconsin Buck and Bear club as the state’s big game record keepers.

Image courtesy Wisconsin Buck and Bear Club

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