Review

Whip’R Panfish Rod

Quality
Reliability
Price/Value
Referability

Trusted Review™ Scorecard

Average Score: 4.3 out of 5.0

Each product or service is rated on Quality, Reliability, Price/Value, and Referability. Each area has an individual score, and creates an overall Trusted Review™.

Whip'R Panfish Rod

I have been on the hunt for several years for a true dropshot rod for fishing gills and yellow perch on the inland lakes here in Michigan. No matter what brand of rods I had looked at, I just couldn’t seem to find what I was looking for. I was trying to find a rod that matched up to a bass dropshot. The rod had to have lots of backbone and taper quickly into the tip section.

For years I just couldn’t find what I wanted, I even entertained custom rods but could never find a blank to match what I was looking for. Fast forward to about a month ago; I was looking at ice fishing products doing some research for some upcoming articles. I was on K & E’s website looking at jigs when something caught my eye. It was a new ice rod combo they were offering. That combo prompted me to look at their other rods and not just the hardwater products.

That is when I saw an image of a fishing rod that had the bend I was looking for with the words “Ultimate Panfish Gear” on it. I started thinking to myself, “have I found the rod I’m looking for?!” I was quickly on the phone with Jim over at K & E asking him about the rod. It wasn’t long until I had a rod in the mail to me so I could do a product review on the rod.

I was excited to see this rod come to my doorstep a few days later. I quickly rigged it up and headed on down to some docks on Lake Erie where I knew there were good numbers of gills and pumpkinseeds. I rigged the rod up with a simple dropshot rig with a waxworm on the hook and started working it like you would a dropshot Goby for bass. It didn’t take long for me to see that this rod had the action and taper I was looking for. Then it was time to change-up the rigging a bit after catching some nice 7 inch gills. I set it up with a Thill Shy bite and started casting to structure. I wanted to check out and see how it handled fishing the way most pan-fishermen would use the rod. It preformed pretty well for a rod in this price point. I fished with this rod on and off on Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair and numerous nameless inland lakes over the next month. I was fairly happy with the rod.

The rod is made of a composite construction, the top third is made of fiberglass which then leads into the back two thirds, which are made of graphite. The rod has a split rear grip which lowers the overall weight of the rod and it shows off it blank through construction. The reel seat was kinda oversized for a panfish rod, but it held the reel tightly. I am not sure on the brand of guides this rod has but they have ceramic inserts which handled the braided line I was using well. The openwater series of these Whip’R Rods comes in 7 lengths from 4ft to 8ft long. I was fishing the 6ft 6 inch model. Many of the rods are two-piece constructions.

Whip’R Panfish Rod, 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 rating

Quality

The quality of this rod is what you would expect for a rod in this price range. It is well made and should give the budget minded angler many years of fishing.

Reliability

This was as reliable as one would expect from a fishing rod: it never broke, the guides were straight, and the epoxy on the threading that holds the guides on looks to be done well. The cork on the handle of the model I used had very little filler in it so that means the must have used a fairly high quality cork. The reel seat on my rod has no slop to it and held the reel tightly.

Price/Value

This rod retails for $29.99 to $38.99, which puts it in just about every fisherman’s price range. In today's rod market this rod is fairly unique, so there really isn’t anything I could compare it to just yet.

Referability

I would recommended this rod to my fellow panfisherman that are on the hunt for a dropshot panfish rod. It is one that is definitely worth a look.

Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of OutdoorHub. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their writers.