DALLAS-Poaching, habitat loss and the complexities of managing Earth’s most diverse collection of game species-all on a continent stressed by civil war, humanitarian crises and corruption-are among the issues awaiting a new generation of wildlife officers in Africa.

An ambitious new class of future wildlife officers now receiving formal education in Tanzania includes four students sponsored by Dallas Safari Club (DSC).

“Our club is very proud to help shape the future of conservation in Africa,” said DSC Executive Director Ben Carter. “There are many challenges but I’m confident that with enough education and appreciation of the benefits that hunting brings to Africa, the challenges can be conquered.”

DSC is partnering with the Friedkin Conservation Fund to help fund the students’ education.

All four students are products of the College of African Wildlife Management, Mweka, in Moshi, Tanzania. Coursework includes wildlife law enforcement and legislation, wildlife policies and strategies, principles and techniques of wildlife management, ornithology, mammalogy, herpetology, archeology, animal physiology, vertebrate anatomy, community conservation of wildlife, tourism management, wildlife resource economics, wildlife population ecology, wildlife nutrition and more.

The DSC-sponsored students include Jacquelin Jordan, Julius Makarot, Veronica Mollel and Frank Riziki.

In a letter, Makarot expressed what scholarships mean to him, his people and the wild resources of his country: “I have been facing a lot of financial difficulties within my studies but I have come to realize that Dallas Safari Club and Friedkin Conservation Fund will bring a lot of changes and solutions through financial aid for my future career. Wildlife management is the course I loved since I was young and through your support my dreams are being fulfilled. The knowledge I am getting will help my Maasai community and Tanzania to be able to take care of the wildlife for future generations. Also, my education will help young Maasai men to have desire to continue with their studies as I will be a role model for them. They will learn the importance of education. This will all bring a big change among Massai towards development of conservation.”

About Dallas Safari Club (DSC)
Desert bighorns on an unbroken landscape, stalking Cape buffalo in heavy brush, students discovering conservation. DSC works to guarantee a future for all these and much more. An independent nonprofit organization since 1982, DSC has become an international leader in conserving wildlife and wilderness lands, educating youth and the general public, and promoting and protecting the rights and interests of hunters worldwide. Get involved at www.biggame.org.

About Friedkin Conservation Fund (FCF)
The Friedkin Conservation Fund (FCF) is a registered (U.S. and Tanzanian) nonprofit, nongovernmental organization incorporated in 1994 (Certificate of Registration SO.NO.9807). Our role is to assist the Tanzanian government with the conservation and preservation of more than 9 million acres of Tanzania’s protected areas. We achieve this through our internationally recognized anti-poaching initiative, our innovative community development program and our field research projects. Based in Arusha, northern Tanzania, we operate in five game reserves, two open areas, three forest reserves and one game controlled area.

Contact:
Steve Wagner, Blue Heron Communications, 800-654-3766 or steve@blueheroncomm.com

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