Your bow’s loud and these deer know it. What makes many of these shots all that much more frustrating was the how close they came. In just a fraction of the second, the deer was able to hear the release and bounce out of the way just in time. Some viewers pointed out that many of shots went high anyways and likely may not have resulted in a kill even if they connected.

Tough luck. Try again tomorrow.

This clip shows you alot can happen between release of your arrow to your target. Things you cannot control. Even further out the more chances you can miss or lose an animal. You are not shooting at a stationary target….. Bowhunting is how close you can get to your target and making that ethical shot! Hunt on!!

Posted by Central Texas Bowhunter "CTB" on Sunday, November 1, 2015

Image from Facebook.

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  • Roger Gatlin

    Okay, I don’t have a problem with Deer Hunters or Hunting in general but when hunters put a feeder out and kill a deer at the feeder is like shooting a duck while it’s still on the water. Isn’t killing a deer after the thrill of the chase and the hunt is what’s it’s all about????? Am I wrong in this thinking?

  • TD

    I hear what you are saying Roger, but some of that depends on where you hunt. Where I grew up in the mid-west, you didn’t use feeders. There was so much food out there and there were a lot of open farm fields and fence rows to pattern deer movement. You could determine where deer traveled probably 75% of the time. Where I hunt now in East Texas (a/k/a “The Big Thicket”), I hate to say a feeder is almost as important as your bow. There is so much ground to cover and it is SO thick that being able to see 100 yards in the woods (from the ground) seems like a clear cut and those patches are rare. Especially in a treestand visibility is 30 yards at best if you pick a great spot and clear some lanes. There are hundreds of trails through the thicket in a few-hundred acre tract. It is distasteful, but (almost) a necessity.