The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $37 million in grants to reduce pollution and improve water quality by upgrading two wastewater treatment plants, designing a facility to treat combined sewer overflows and creating a living shoreline. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“Projects such as these are an important part of our effort to improve Maryland waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay,” said Governor O’Malley. “These projects reduce pollution and protect public health while creating jobs for more Marylanders.”

The following projects were approved today in the following locations:

Sod Run Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Harford County

A $33,498,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Harford County, in addition to $4,414,450 in previous Bay Restoration Fund and other states grants, will help fund the planning, design and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the 20 million gallons-per-day Sod Run Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62.5 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Bush River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

Joppatowne Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Harford County

A $2,646,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to Harford County, in addition to $955,732 in previous Bay Restoration Fund and other state grants, will help fund the planning, design and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the 0.95 million gallons-per-day Joppatowne Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62.5 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged to the Gunpowder River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay. Excessive amounts of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus lead to lowered levels of oxygen needed to support aquatic life in waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay. Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrades of the state’s major wastewater treatment plants are a critical component of Maryland’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan.

Cumberland Combined Sewer Overflow Storage Facility Project – Allegany County

A $1,008,835 Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Project Funds grant to the City of Cumberland, in addition to a previous $300,000 grant, will help fund the planning and design of a facility near the Cumberland wastewater treatment plant for storage and subsequent treatment of combined sewer overflows before discharge into the Potomac River. The project is part of the larger Cumberland Combined Sewer Overflow Improvements Project, which is required by a Consent Decree. The project will reduce overflows of untreated wastewater with bacteria and other pollutants to the Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Rhode River/Cheston Point Living Shoreline Project – Anne Arundel County

A $354,000 Water Quality State Revolving Loan Fund Green Grant to the Chesapeake Bay Trust will help fund the construction of stone breakwaters, a sand beach and marsh and upland plants using the living shoreline technique to create about 3.5 acres of new wetlands. The new wetlands will protect about 1,500 feet of shoreline from erosion and will filter stormwater runoff, reducing the nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment that enter the Chesapeake Bay and providing a habitat for wildlife.

What's Your Reaction?

Like
Like Love Haha Wow Sad Angry