As strict new gun laws in New York, Colorado, Connecticut, and Maryland have gun makers eyeing a move, Texas Governor Rick Perry spots a business opportunity.

The governor’s office announced on Monday that he will be traveling from June 16 through June 20 to meet with leaders in the firearm industry of New York and Connecticut. His trip will be heralded by two 30-second commercials showcasing the opportunities available in Texas. The video will “feature Texans from all walks of life–from small business owners and doctors, to top researchers and filmmakers,” and is the latest attempt by Texas to sweet talk manufacturers whose futures in their home states are no longer secure.

Gun manufacturer PTR Industries already announced that they will be uprooting from their Connecticut location by the end of summer while Colt and nearby Beretta, two of the most recognizable names in the firearm industry, have voiced concerns over Connecticut and Maryland’s new policies.

In March, Colt President Dennis Veilleux closed down the company’s factory operations for a day to transport roughly 600 workers to the state capital in protest of the gun control proposals.

“If we ban this product in the state where we make it, our customers will take their business to another brand,” Vielleux said at the time. “When we start to get erosion of our customers, we lose our market share.”

Likewise, Beretta called Maryland’s gun bill package “not acceptable” and that “the law that finally passed went from being atrocious to simply being bad.”

As traditionally gun-tight states California and New Jersey move along with their own sets of proposals, other states are opening their arms -and economy- to potential migrants. In a bid to draw gun makers to Missouri, local lawmakers and a private landowner are offering free land to any manufacture who wants to set up shop in the state.

“Missouri has a well-earned reputation as a ‘gun-friendly’ state,” said Missouri’s Lt. Governor Peter Kinder. “I am proud to represent a state that values the Constitution and stands against the federal government’s attempts to infringe upon our Second and Tenth Amendment rights. Through the efforts of Larry Pratt, Michael Evans, and business leaders in the West Plains area, Missouri can send a clear message to out-of-state gun makers who face burdensome regulations, high taxes and restrictions on their products. That message is, ‘Move to Missouri.’”

At the head of the receptive states is Texas, and in no small part due to Governor Perry’s efforts. Perry appeared at the National Rifle Association convention at Houston last month and was one of the event’s most well-received speakers. Of course, the convention took place in Houston, Texas.

“Some things remain the same,” Perry said before the NRA audience. “The governor of Texas is still a proud lifetime member of the National Rifle Association. Texas and the NRA are almost a perfect fit.”

Perry continued to express disappointment in the legislation passed in some other states while arguing for the rights of gun owners across the nation.

“We’ll happily welcome any gun manufacturer who feels vilified and any of their employees who are in danger of losing their livelihoods due to this kind of hysteria,” Perry said. “There’s still a place that loves freedom in America, where people can pursue their dreams free from knee-jerk government regulation. That place is called Texas!”

Video of the speech can be viewed below:

Industry leaders are advised by Perry’s office to visit TexasWideOpenForBusiness.com for more information on the benefits the state can provide.

Image screenshot of video by NRAVideos on YouTube

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2 thoughts on “Texas Sends Governor Rick Perry to Court Gun Makers

  1. Good job CT. Way to lose money for our state. Nothing like hiding behind Sandy Hook to push your b.s. gun laws. That tragedy had absolutely nothing to do with how Lanza obtained his firearms. Its all about money, jacking up our taxes more once our gun manufacturers leave. This is a great state, too bad we have a bunch of a–holes running it.

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