This is a Steyr Mannlicher Match Free Pistol, and it’s probably not a gun that many of you have seen before. Besides its odd shape, the Steyr FP1’s claim to fame is it’s absurdly light trigger weight, which can actually be adjusted to just 15 grams. At that point, pulling the trigger is practically optional—something as light as a gust of wind is enough to fire this pistol.

“Setting a cocked free pistol down too hard, bumping it, or brushing the trigger can set it off,” wrote Reddit user Scioso, who recently posted pictures of the rare competition pistol to Imgur.

Scioso goes on to say that this specific Steyr FP1 is adjusted for a 1.2-ounce trigger weight. It is chambered for .22 LR and unlike most modern free pistols, is a breech loading and top charging model. Free pistol competition is one of the most challenging disciplines in ISSF shooting and requires hitting a tiny target at 50 meters. Rules dictate that the pistol must be in .22 caliber with conventional iron sights, and operated by one hand unsupported. Pretty difficult stuff.

However, the trigger can be as light as the shooter wants, and this has led to some insane trigger weights. The Steyr FP1 has a reputation for unerring accuracy and is even rumored to have been outright banned in many competitions. Currently it is no longer produced and rather hard to get a hold of. Due to its light trigger, the Steyr FP1 is also feared for its spontaneous firing when handled by negligent shooters.

“Even experienced shooters have put shots into walls, ceilings, and floors. I have not yet, [with] yet being the key word. Extreme caution is taken with these types of pistols,” wrote Scioso.

If you were wondering how the gun is supposed to held, it looks something like this:

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Update 10-7-2015: Removed a rather hilarious typo.

 

Images from Imgur

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One thought on “Photos: What a 1-ounce Trigger Looks Like

  1. Free pistol is an Olympic shooting discipline shot over 50 metres, not feet. I note the correction in the text, but the comments with the photos still refer to 50 feet

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