Anti-Hunters Want More Billboards Calling for Suburban Bowhunting Ban

   05.30.19

If you live in New Jersey, you may have noticed an anti-hunting billboard on the New Jersey N/S Route 3 east of Route 120 calling for a suburban bowhunting ban.

According to this GoFundMe page, the Animal Protection League of New Jersey (APLNJ) – the group responsible for the advertisement – is seeking “humane, non-lethal methods to handle deer conflicts” in the Saddle River region of Bergen County. The problem, though, is the “non-lethal methods” this group is calling for includes sterilization, which is typically ineffective and quite costly. On top of that, there are numerous hunters who would pay to take part in local whitetail population control.

Suburban Bowhunting Ban
It doesn’t really look like this campaign is taking off..

NorthJersey.com reports United Bowhunters of New Jersey (UBNJ) “has culled 90 deer since Oct. 4” in an effort to thin the local herd, said Administrator Jerry Giaimis.

“There are over 200 properties that have either allowed culling or allowed participants to retrieve wounded deer from their properties,” Giaimis continued “The implementation of the program is a success, and no significant difficulties have occurred.”

Bowhunting is currently allowed in Saddle River, NJ as long as hunters are following proper rules and regulations, but activists are doing anything they can to shut it down. Even going as far to make false claims about how bowhunting endangers their families:

Should a child pick up or step on an arrow, they could become injured. To give you an idea of how sharp the arrows are, hunters use a special wrench to attach the arrow to the arrow shaft, to avoid cutting themselves.

Despite what this group claims, suburban bowhunting in select areas is safe and absolutely necessary for successful conservation purposes. If you’re lucky, some farmers/land owners may even give you the thumbs up to hunt on their property, as large numbers of deer can cause all kinds of headaches when you’re growing crops around your house.

What are your thoughts on this issue?

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