TrackingPoint had a stall set up on the long-range section of the firing line at Media Day, and their firearms drew quite the crowd. I was able to fire one round through the 1000 Series 300T rifle, which is chambered in .300 Win Mag and features a 24-inch barrel and 6-30x “smart scope.” The 300T is built on a Surgeon Rifles action and mounted in an Accuracy International chassis. The rifle’s optics are also capable of recording and streaming video to an associated device, such as a laptop.

Using the TrackingPoint system is somewhat awkward at first, but is easily understood and employed. First, the operator places the scope’s reticle over a target and “tags” it by tapping a red button in front of the trigger. The scope then tracks the chosen target and the reticle adjusts to compensate for wind, drop, cant, and so on. Following this adjustment, the operator must move the reticle back to his or her target. When the reticle turns red, the gun is locked on target and will land the shot appropriately once the trigger is pulled. At any point after a target has been tagged, the operator may depress the trigger, allowing the gun to fire immediately upon proper alignment. It’s a mouthful to describe and may still come off confusing, but in practice it’s quite astounding.

OutdoorHub's Colin Anthony shoots the TrackingPoint 1000 Series 300T rifle chambered in .300 Win Mag.
OutdoorHub’s Colin Anthony shoots the TrackingPoint 1000 Series 300T rifle chambered in .300 Win Mag.

Before landing my own 967-yard shot with the 300T, I watched two other shooters land three nearly-thousand-yard shots one after the other. This was all done without any familiarity with the TrackingPoint system’s “smart optics” beyond a quick two-minute introduction. Though the technology may be impractical for many shooters, seeing it in action is very impressive.

The 300T is expected to sell for around $25,000.

Images by Matt Korovesis, Colin Anthony, and Joe Gregus

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