“You are a hunter. It is the best part of you,” says David Farbman, author and founder of OutdoorHub.

Away from the field, hunters are something else. They are mechanics, farmers, engineers, business leaders, fathers, mothers, and people with a hundred things on their shoulders. But David stresses that treestands and blinds are no places for distractions—nor are they places for worrying about everything else happening in your life.

“How many times have you sat in a blind and thought you should be doing a million other things?” David asks. “Things centered around work, family, relationships—all stuff that you’ve set aside in pursuit of that elusive buck, tom, or flock of geese. What if I told you to never feel guilty again? What if I told you that everything you’ve learned sitting and waiting are the only weapons you need to succeed in every aspect of your life?”

That is the key principal behind what David calls “The Hunt” system. Hunting, whether you do it for the harvest, the thrill of the chase, or to spend time with family, is a constant learning experience applicable to every other situation in your life. As a lifelong hunter and businessman, David has sought to blend those two aspects seamlessly together.

In few occasions are we as focused as a hunter at full draw. After weeks (or months) of preparation, we see a buck come so close we notice the movement of his eyes, regal and wary. Silently, we brush the skin of our cheeks as we prepare to loose, and then the arrow takes flight. In that one moment, there is nothing else in the world but you and your target. Imagine bringing this intense focus into other aspects of your life.

“When you hunt you have clarity and focus and faith in yourself, your skills, your instincts,” David says. “Every trophy you have taken, every ghost that’s gotten away has taught you something. Something about yourself, nature, relationships, business, and now is the time to take what you already know and stand and fight for the things you want out of life.”

What is The Hunt? Take a look at David’s teaser below:

As a public speaker, David has been traveling the country talking about The Hunt and how hunters should take advantage of those skills in other arenas of life.

The Hunt will be available on Amazon Kindle and in bookstores everywhere.
‘The Hunt’ will be available on Amazon Kindle and in bookstores everywhere.

“The skills you have spent years honing in the fields are now the key to taking the targets you want most in life: a bigger home, better car, happy marriage, successful business—these are all in your grasp when you leverage your hunters’ instinct. No target is too big, no goal is out of reach when The Hunt is your guide.”

In order to bring his message to a larger audience, David has released his book The Hunt: Target, Track, and Attain Your Goals through publisher Jossey-Bass, a Wiley brand. His passion for The Hunt’s philosophy may border on passionately spiritual, but David says there is no ego in it. The book is not about him, he explains, it’s about the readers. It’s about about how hunters—in the field or the boardroom—already have all the tools they need for success.

“Success is always in season,” David says.

Images courtesy David Farbman

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20 thoughts on “David Farbman: Why No Hunter Should Feel Guilty, Ever

  1. I like David’s concepts a lot. Good paragraph: “The skills you have spent years honing in the fields are now the key to taking the targets you want most in life: a bigger home, better car, happy marriage, successful business—these are all in your grasp when you leverage your hunters’ instinct. No target is too big, no goal is out of reach when The Hunt is your guide.” David presents an ideal; a mindset and behavior that are aspirational. However, when a hunter violates the hunter’s code, when a hunter acts unethically, when a hunter needlessly hurts an animal, perhaps the hunter should feel guilt, yes?

    1. Michael I love how You always go deep my man. This isn’t what I meant about not feeling guilty but in the case you bring up than yes I agree. There is nothing more tough on the conscious of a hunter than wounding an animal. That is why we should wait for the right shot

      1. David: thank you for your affirming comment. The distinction between ethics and improper hunter behavior; between virtuous human action and crass hurtful action, must guide every facet of hunting and the shooting sports. In my many lectures, I emphasize that hunter ethics will influence not only game management but culture itself; will influence political decisions and, thus, ultimately, the survival of the rights and privileges to own and use firearms and indeed, the survival of the animals we treasure and seek to conserve. I am pleased my thoughts resonate with you. MGS

      2. I also emphasize, on the micro level, the concept of “the right shot” is a profoundly moral assessment premised upon the use of virtues such as self-restraint, humility, awareness of one’s limitations, judgment and prudence, among others, to effect ethical action. Cheers !!

  2. No doubt, business and life and darn near everything are hunting. Just ordered a copy of the book from barnes and noble and will be reading it Thursday night when the mrs is out with her friends. I heard it is an incredible read so i am very excited!

  3. David wrote: “Something about yourself, nature, relationships, business, and now is the time to take what you already know and stand and fight for the things you want out of life.” David expresses an uplifting vision. But the key is to know the value of what you experienced and to have the ability for introspection and for judgment and wisdom to interpret those relationships and what you know and what you stand for. Developing these qualities are as demanding as developing the skills to be a successful hunter, in the field and in life. And to be an ambassador to teach these lessons and relationships. It takes work. It’s not easy.

      1. David: given your replies to my comments, you may find alluring a broader statement of my assessment of your article. I am presently writing a book on hunting ethics and the relationship between teaching ethics and rhetoric to securing our hunting heritage. You may have comments that can enrich my book. I welcome a dialogue.

      2. chatting with you would be a kick! I write for about ten hunting and shooting magazines, work with the Wounded Warriors, The United States Olympic Shooting Association, teach hunter education and lecture on hunting ethics, persuasion and rhetoric in the USA and Canada. I have written a book on how to teach moral reasoning to young children. Yet you do stuff I am not skilled at doing. And you can help promote the messages we both value in a way I cannot. Here is my email: michaelsabbeth@ymail.com Suggest some times and I will clear my calendar. It will be fun. Take care.

      3. suggest some times to talk. You might find intriguing my comment made today, a few minutes ago. It is on the topic of guilt.

      4. by the way, I am going turkey hunting in two weeks in Kansas with the president of the Boone & Crockett Club. I will be using hundred-year-old Vintage English shotguns. Want an article for Outdoor Hub?

  4. Farbman has hit on an important theme… actually several themes. Discussion of these themes can be helpful to all hunters. The discussions should not stop. Only by ethical action through self discipline and moral judgment will the rights and privileges of hunting be preserved. The hunter’s actions influence the culture and the culture influences the politics. Politics dictate hunting rights and privileges. I am a big believer in the role of guilt. Some things hunters should feel guilty about–not being prepared, not being sufficiently skilled, taking a shot that should not have been taken–and some things hunters SHOULD NOT FEEL GUILTY ABOUT–shooting a trophy animal, the behavior of unrelated hunters, killing an animal that is beautiful, standing up to people who want to unreasonably limit gun ownership and use. There are times to feel guilty and times to confidently express a lack of guilt. One must know the difference.

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